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KEF cabinet restoring

 
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lt2525
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Joined: 14 Oct 2009
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Location: Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:15 pm    Post subject: KEF cabinet restoring Reply with quote

Most of the threads here deal with the electronic characteristics of these lovely KEF speakers.

I obtained my pair of 105's in a resale arrangement and while in decent shape, the cabinets are a bit worn.

Has anyone restored the cabinet exterior? I realize that the wood grain is only a very thin veneer. Is it possible to use some sand paper and stain maybe to spruce it up a bit?

Any ideas or suggestions in this area?

Thanks
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Thierry
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Location: France - Outskirts of Paris

PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 8:42 pm    Post subject: Re: KEF cabinet restoring Reply with quote

lt2525 wrote:
Most of the threads here deal with the electronic characteristics of these lovely KEF speakers.

I obtained my pair of 105's in a resale arrangement and while in decent shape, the cabinets are a bit worn.

Has anyone restored the cabinet exterior? I realize that the wood grain is only a very thin veneer. Is it possible to use some sand paper and stain maybe to spruce it up a bit?

Any ideas or suggestions in this area?

Thanks


Been there, done that : https://picasaweb.google.com/109296933751482509949/Kef105_II

These ladies deserve the best attention a good man can give them.

Thierry


Shown for illustration only, any brand will do










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ColinR
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Joined: 31 Jul 2004
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Location: Staffordshire

PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're into boating Very Happy , chandlers generally have a good range of oxalic acid based products for the removal of white water stains from teak and mahogany veneers.

Be warned it's harder with speakers to get a good result as marine ply is considerably thicker.

If you have a large dark water stain (as often seen on sleezeBay), forget it, the veneer is too thin to play with chemicals and wire wool.

Three coats of spray paint with lots of rubbing down plus a couple of coats of laquer will be required Neutral .
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Innercity126
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Joined: 25 Oct 2011
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Location: Sea World, Texas

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the process of doing just that to my 105's, now. I was going to go the wood filler route and simply repair the various damaged areas, but the chips were too big, so I am now just going to re-veneer both speakers using teak wood.

If you can get away with stripping them down and refinishing them, so much the better. Thierry's post is a perfect example of just how beautiful they can turn out when doing it this way.

Assess the condition of the veneer. If the damage is superficial, then you may get away with just a strip and refinish. If this is the case, whenever possible use a hand block sander and fine grit papers, so you don't sand through the veneer.

Stick with whatever stain the current wood is, as it's just easier to match, and finish with a good, quick drying finish. I've always had success when using Deft spray on wood finishes.

There are numerous methods to accomplish the task at hand, so experiment using different techniques until you find the one you are most comfortable with.
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speakerguru
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Location: Green Hut, Tovil

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Innercity126 wrote:
I was going to go the wood filler route and simply repair the various damaged areas, but the chips were too big, so I am now just going to re-veneer both speakers using teak wood.

Some of the cabinet guys in the factory in the 70s and 80s were amazing. They could fill and then paint a match to a veneer so you ended up with an invisible repair. I've seen reject cabinets that had had a hammer put through the side, filled, painted and re-laquered so that they could then buy the cabinets as seconds for their own use. Even if the repair was pointed out to you, close up, you could not tell where the hole had been.
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audiolabtower
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can some kind soul tell someone who knows nothing about woodworking in simple terms how to spruce up a dull looking cabinet, Nothing wrong with the veneer or joins, just dull after 30 years and a few vacuum cleaner scuffs at the bottom which you cannot see unless right up close. I've looked at various products on the shelves many times but just afraid of making things worse, and am admiring of the refurbished cabs you see pictured on this site.
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Thierry
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

audiolabtower wrote:
Can some kind soul tell someone who knows nothing about woodworking in simple terms how to spruce up a dull looking cabinet, Nothing wrong with the veneer or joins, just dull after 30 years and a few vacuum cleaner scuffs at the bottom which you cannot see unless right up close. I've looked at various products on the shelves many times but just afraid of making things worse, and am admiring of the refurbished cabs you see pictured on this site.


Hi

In some cases best is to completely remove veneer but this is a bit tricky and needs some practice (and don't forget to take your "brave pills" too).


Here's another exemple of restoration I did on 40 years speakers cabinets :

Link to slideshow https://picasaweb.google.com/109296933751482509949/Elipson1303#slideshow/5660068981939461010

The top was badly stained and there were also some chips here and there :


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audiolabtower
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, thanks, but my veneer is fine, just dull. I just want to ?clean? it and maybe re-varnish and ?seal? the surface for the next years, and am after instructions and simple products available in the UK.
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speakerguru
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2011 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A light sanding with wet-and-dry followed by a respray with clear varnish may be all that is required. The factory used to use "Spectra" clear for minor repairs (available from Maidstone car part shops). If there has been bleaching from the sun then you might like to use a stain in between sanding and spraying. Try it out on the back first maybe?
Minor dings were steamed out with a damp cloth and soldering iron. Scratches were filled with a range of coloured waxes followed by painting to match the grain, and yes, they did seem to be able to paint and spray over wax without any problems!
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audiolabtower
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2011 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. Damp cloth/soldering iron... that's the sort of thing that fills me with dread on ruining a nice cabinet Laughing
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